New: Follow us on Tumblr, Snapchat, and Periscope

New: Follow us on Tumblr, Snapchat, and Periscope

We’ve been quietly building our presences on Tumblr, Snapchat, and Periscope over the past several months. So now we’d like to officially announce that we’re ready for you to start following us on those sites and apps. We’re using Tumblr as a platform to be more responsive to answering your questions. And we like Snapchat and Periscope to share video content that’s not quite right for YouTube; more spontaneous in-the-moment stuff. We hope to be seeing you in these spaces as...
Vegan Ben & Jerry’s Review

Vegan Ben & Jerry’s Review

It’s been a long time coming. Many of you probably didn’t know this, but prior to going vegan, Ryan was a huge fan of their Chunky Monkey ice cream. Much to Ryan’s pleasure, and due to the urging of dairy free ice cream fans, Ben & Jerry’s has re-invented Chunky Monkey, along with 3 other flavors – all of which are certified vegan! So is it some second rate re-creation of their dairy offerings? Far from it: they nailed it! Their non dairy ice creams are so spot on that you could let anyone eat an an entire pint and they would have no clue that they just ate a pint of vegan ice cream. It’s that good! The new non-dairy flavors are Chunky Monkey, Chocolate Fudge Brownie,Coffee Caramel Crunch, and P.B. & Cookies. For more information, check out Ben & Jerry’s:...
Altra One 2.5 Runing Shoe Review

Altra One 2.5 Runing Shoe Review

The Altra One 2.5 is my favorite running at the moment. Having put over 1600 miles in my Nike Free 5.0’s that I’ve ran in past 2 years, I was looking for new shoe with a similar lightweight, minimal type of running shoe. I was curious to see if there may be something better than the Nike’s so after speaking with some of the better runners I know, they pointed me towards the Altra line of shoes. The One 2.5 is Altra’s take on a lightweight, softly cushioned running shoe. As with all of Altra’s shoes, the One 2.5 incorporates what they call Zero Drop; a design which places the heel and forefoot the same distance from the ground. Even the Nike’s have a 8mm heel drop. The Altra’s lack of heel drop encourages good running form; a more fore or mid-foot strike, rather than a heel strike which typically leads to a stronger impact and more injuries. I’m a huge fan the Zero Drop and a fore-foot strike. So much so that I now find it difficult to run in shoes that have a heal drop. I can get by in the Nike Free’s, but putting on my old pair of Brooks Ghost 4 feels like I’m wearing some awkward orthopedic shoes. Similar to the wider toe box design of the Nike Frees, Altra incorporates what they call a FootShape toe box into their shoes. Rather than squeezing your toes tightly together as many traditional running shoes do, Altra’s wider toe box design allows the toes to relax and spread out naturally. I can’t say enough how much...
How to Transition to Minimalist Running Shoes

How to Transition to Minimalist Running Shoes

After years of wearing traditional running shoes, I recently decided to check out the growing trend of minimalist footwear. Despite the many advances in running shoe technology over the past few decades, running injuries are still common. The minimalist shoe proponents argue that the “protective” features of traditional running shoes actually weaken the foot by protecting it too much. Minimalist shoes, which forgo the cushioning and arch support of most traditional shoes, are said to allow the foot to move more freely and naturally, allowing various small muscles in the foot to strengthen and thereby decrease running injuries.   Safely switching from traditional running shoes to minimalist shoes requires some time and effort. Since minimalist shoes offer little in the the way of heel cushioning, it’s important to develop a more barefoot-style running technique, which is a mid to forefoot strike, rather than the common heal strike. When first starting out with minimalist shoes, I suggest using them for shorter runs, as it takes time for your muscles and tendons, which had previously been cushioned, to adapt and strengthen. Gradually increase the length of your runs over a period of weeks or even months, paying attention to how your body responds. You can always save your traditional shoes for longer runs until you grow accustomed to your new shoes.   I’ve been running in my minimalist shoes for three months and now feel that my body has adjusted to them sufficiently for all of my runs. Compared to my previous shoes, running in minimalist shoes feels much more free and natural and my foot fall is virtually silent. Without the pounding cadence of my old...
Nike Free Run +3 Review & First Impressions

Nike Free Run +3 Review & First Impressions

After running in Brooks Ghost 4 shoes for a year, I felt it was time to change to a more minimal running shoe. More and more runners are catching on to the fact that shoes which boast more “protection” and “cushioning” really don’t protect you from running injuries, despite the marketing claims. And in spite of all the advances in shoe technology, runner’s injuries are higher than ever. The minimalist shoe proponents say that these “protective” shoes actually weaken the foot by protecting it too much and not allowing it to move properly and develop needed strength. Nike’s line of Free shoes takes the minimalist shoe idea to an ever further idea: not only do they remove most of the “protective” elements of most modern running shoes, they have a unique sole that allows that the foot to bend and flex in a way that’s more akin to being barefoot. Changing to minimalist shoes requires some adaptations and the Frees are no exception. For starters, if you’re a heal striker, you’d be best served by trying to work on a more mid to forefoot strike, which is how we strike when running barefoot. Minimalist shoes offer little in the the way of heel cushioning. Secondly, you don’t want to go out and run full time in them right away. It takes times for muscles and tendons, which had previously been cushioned away, to adjust and adapt to being called on. I suggest using them at first for your shorter runs, while doing your long runs in your previous shoes. And gradually increase the length of those shorter runs over...
Where Do You Get Your Protein? The Protein Myth.

Where Do You Get Your Protein? The Protein Myth.

What’s the truth regarding the amount of protein needed in our diet? Ryan and Anji debunk the protein myth and show why we don’t need to eat meat to safely satisfy our protein needs. Seemingly unbeknownst to most people, all plant foods contain protein. If you’re eating enough calories on a plant based diet, you’re eating enough protein. Ryan’s vegan protein article on MindBodyGreen:...